Journal Club

Article of the Year: ACEs and Counter-ACEs: How Positive and Negative Childhood Experiences Influence Adult Health

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ISPCAN Resources

Focus of this Article

Child Abuse & Neglect Article of the Year finalist: Join co-authors Ali Crandall and Brianna Magnusson of the Department of Public Health at Brigham Young University as they discuss their 2019 article that focuses on how positive childhood experiences may lead to better adult health, especially in the presence of adversity. While numerous studies over the past two decades have found a link between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and worse adult health outcomes, recent findings have shown that positive experiences (or counter-ACEs) may mitigate the effects of ACEs on adolescent and adult health and may of themselves be important to lifelong wellbeing. Drs. Crandall and Magnusson will discuss these findings in the context of childhood trauma and the policy and practice implications.

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Journal Club Date:

October 7, 2021

Region:

Global

Topics:

ACE's
Presentation Slides - Countering ACEs with Advantageous Childhood Experiences

Featured Journal Articles:

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Learning Objectives:

Objective & Hypotheses • To examine how counter-ACEs affect adult physical and mental health Hypotheses:
1. Counter-ACEs will predict positive behaviors and outcomes and protect against adverse outcomes
2. Counter-ACEs will neutralize the negative effects of ACEs on adult health
3. The relationship between ACEs and adult health will be attenuated in those with higher counter-ACE scores
4. Counter-ACEs will have less effect on those with 4 or more ACEs compared to those with 3 or fewer ACEs.

Authored By:

Brainna
BRIANNA MAGNUSSON, PhD, MPH
BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH
Brianna Magnusson, PhD, MPH is an associate professor of epidemiology in the Department of Public Health at Brigham Young University. Dr. Magnusson’s research focuses on mental, emotional, and sexual health, particularly in the emerging adult period. She is particularly interested in identifying family and childhood environmental influences that impact emerging adult health. Dr. Magnusson received her PhD and MPH degrees from Virginia Commonwealth University and teaches courses in epidemiology, biostatistics, and program evaluation at BYU. She is currently serving as associate chair of the Department of Public Health at BYU.
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ALI CRANDALL, PhD, MPH
BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH
Ali Crandall, PhD, MPH, is an associate professor in the Department of Public Health at Brigham Young University. Dr. Crandall’s research focuses on the effects of family health on adolescent and adult mental wellbeing. She conducts survey research in community and online samples to better understand how family experiences in childhood lead to adult family health, with the ultimate goal of facilitating a greater family focus in public health practice. A secondary research interest is to better understand how cognitive health, such as self-regulation and executive functioning, affect family and individual health behaviors. Dr. Crandall received her PhD from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and her MPH from Loma Linda University. She teaches classes in families and public health, program planning, and evaluation at BYU, and also directs BYU’s MPH program.