North America Regional Network
The North America Regional Network is a group of North America-based multidisciplinary professionals working in child abuse & neglect connecting, learning, sharing ideas, research & knowledge.
ISPCAN North America Regional Network

Connect with ISPCAN Members Globally or Regionally on the Member Connect Platform

Non-Members

Members

Regional Country Partners

USA
Apsac Logo
The American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children (APSAC)
Mexico
GuardianesLogo
Guardianes
United States
ICAPLogo
International Center for Assault Prevention (ICAP)
United States
NACC Logo
National Association of Counsel for Children (NACC)
Mexico
Reinserta Logo
Reinserta
Mexico
Tecsalud Logo
Tecsalud

Become a country partner

ISPCAN’s Country Partners are multidisciplinary organizations or non-profits within a city, country or region who focus and work in child abuse and neglect (CAN) prevention. The goal is to share experiences, knowledge, research, and resources across all regions in an endeavor to strengthen efforts at local, national, and regional levels to end child maltreatment. We believe that effective and sustainable CAN prevention is achieved through education and professional cooperation. See country partners by region on ISPCAN regional pages.

Special Affiliation with ISPCAN
Promotion of your organization and events by ISPCAN to our Global Audience via email, Social Media and Newsletters
Recognition on our website, in our Annual Report, and other publications
Access to the ISPCAN Country Partner Logo
Priority opportunities for ISPCAN Congress co-sponsorship
Free booth at our ISPCAN Congresses
Special Community of learning with other Country Partners
Subscription to Child Abuse & Neglect: The International Journal
Opportunities to showcase your programs in our newsletter, webinars, and circles of connecting.
Contribute content to World Perspectives on Child Abuse and other ISPCAN publications
Opportunity to lead trainings, webinars, circles of connecting,, working groups in your region

North America Regional Network Resources

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More resources coming soon.

Additional Resources

Implications of a Review of the Internet Child Exploitation (ICE) – Counselling Program in Ontario, Canada

Dr. Jennifer Martin, PhD. Dr. Andrea Slane, PhD. Shannon Brown, M.A Kate Hann, M.A - Toronto Metropolitan University and Ontario Tech University

Downloadable Resource

(Public Access)

More than 12 percent of children in the United States—nine million children—live in homes where a parent or other adult uses illegal drugs. The impact on these children can be devastating. They are three times more likely than children in drug-free environments to be verbally, physically, or sexually abused and four times more likely to be neglected. It is hard to find these kids—and harder still to protect them. Fortunately, organizations like the National Alliance for Drug Endangered Children (National DEC) and their affiliated state, local, and tribal DEC alliances continue to make great strides in establishing training and resources that help law enforcement, social workers, teachers, community groups, and others identify and assist children growing up in these tragic circumstances. National DEC regularly demonstrates that we can provide a powerfully visible alternative to the neglect and violence that are part of the daily lives of far too many children. We can intervene more effectively to help mitigate the long-term negative effects children face when they are exposed to this kind of trauma. Using trauma-informed approaches to respond to children who are endangered by drugs is increasingly becoming a central part of law enforcement’s mission to serve and protect. This new edition of Promising Practices for Helping Drug Endangered Children: Paths to a Common Vision (originally published in 2014) highlights resources National DEC has developed to facilitate the establishment of state, local, and tribal alliances; it also gives examples of how many agencies are consistently using those resources to carry out the organization’s three-part mission and make a difference in children’s lives. It can help you and your agency collaborate with others in your community to make identifying and serving these children part of your daily routine. Every child deserves to grow up in a home free from abuse and neglect. Together, we can make that a reality.

The National Alliance for Drug Endangered Children (National DEC) teaches early identification, response, and appropriate intervention services for children and families affected by parental or caregiver substance misuse.

Partner Resource

(Public Access)

CheckDEC is a free mobile app developed by the National Alliance for Drug Endangered Children that immediately connects children, families and professionals to substance use related information, crisis helplines, drug and treatment information, supportive resources and services within their local area

National Alliance for Drug Endangered Children (National DEC)

Partner Resource

(Public Access)

4 Innovative Online Training Courses; 30-45 minutes each The courses feature interviews with a wide array of experts from across the U.S., interactive graphics, scenario videos and a virtual tour of a home impacted by drug presence. All disciplines that come in contact with children should enroll in these trainings.

National Alliance for Drug Endangered Children (National DEC)

Partner Resource

(Public Access)

NCAC’s online library, CALiO Collections, is an assortment of thousands of unrestricted full-text publications, videos, audio files, articles, reports, and more which are searchable by key words.

National Children's Advocacy Center (NCAC)

Partner Resource

(Public Access)

The following Regional Data Profile is based on information provided by knowledgeable professionals in the country. It is often difficult to capture the varying circumstances and ISPCAN was unable to verify the accuracy of the information. It is our hope that each profile offers a useful snapshot of issues related to child protection in each country. The 2020 World Perspectives survey was modified for this most recent data collection, mostly to help clarify the meaning of some questions and provide more guidance to respondents. Respondents were given a link to complete the survey online. The development of the survey was guided by input from an international advisory committee convened for the purposes of collecting country level data and who are acknowledged for their invaluable contributions. The content covered consideration of what circumstances were CM in the country; specific policies regarding CM; legal responses to child sexual exploitation (CSE); services used to address CM; prevention strategies; and barriers to prevention. Data was gathered between December 2019 and February 2020. It is important to note that data on many of the issues may not have been available, requiring respondents to provide educated estimates. We obtained information from 62 countries including 10 countries in Africa, 9 in the Americas, 19 in Asia, 22 in Europe, and Australia and New Zealand in Oceania. Countries were also categorized by income level using designations by the World Bank; 27 countries had high income, 20 upper-middle income and 15 were low income. Those who responded are considered experts in their countries in different disciplines with knowledge of country-level data, and they were encouraged to consult with colleagues when uncertain of an answer. That said, ISPCAN was unable to verify the accuracy of responses. In conclusion, this report offers a snapshot of the state of CM and child protection across many countries across the globe. Taken together over the history of publication, much has been accomplished—especially in terms of awareness of the child maltreatment problem and the development of systems to address it. That said, concerns from infrastructure to expertise, to leveraging the lived experience of communities, remains a challenge made even more.

ISPCAN

Downloadable Resource

(Member Access)

This Country Data Profile is based on information provided by knowledgeable professionals in the country. It is often difficult to capture the varying circumstances and ISPCAN was unable to verify the accuracy of the information. It is our hope that each profile offers a useful snapshot of issues related to child protection in each country. The 2020 World Perspectives survey was modified for this most recent data collection, mostly to help clarify the meaning of some questions and provide more guidance to respondents. Respondents were given a link to complete the survey online. The development of the survey was guided by input from an international advisory committee convened for the purposes of collecting country level data and who are acknowledged for their invaluable contributions. The content covered consideration of what circumstances were CM in the country; specific policies regarding CM; legal responses to child sexual exploitation (CSE); services used to address CM; prevention strategies; and barriers to prevention. Data was gathered between December 2019 and February 2020. It is important to note that data on many of the issues may not have been available, requiring respondents to provide educated estimates.

ISPCAN

Downloadable Resource

(Member Access)

This Country Data Profile is based on information provided by knowledgeable professionals in the country. It is often difficult to capture the varying circumstances and ISPCAN was unable to verify the accuracy of the information. It is our hope that each profile offers a useful snapshot of issues related to child protection in each country. The 2020 World Perspectives survey was modified for this most recent data collection, mostly to help clarify the meaning of some questions and provide more guidance to respondents. Respondents were given a link to complete the survey online. The development of the survey was guided by input from an international advisory committee convened for the purposes of collecting country level data and who are acknowledged for their invaluable contributions. The content covered consideration of what circumstances were CM in the country; specific policies regarding CM; legal responses to child sexual exploitation (CSE); services used to address CM; prevention strategies; and barriers to prevention. Data was gathered between December 2019 and February 2020. It is important to note that data on many of the issues may not have been available, requiring respondents to provide educated estimates.

ISPCAN

Downloadable Resource

(Member Access)

This Country Data Profile is based on information provided by knowledgeable professionals in the country. It is often difficult to capture the varying circumstances and ISPCAN was unable to verify the accuracy of the information. It is our hope that each profile offers a useful snapshot of issues related to child protection in each country. The 2020 World Perspectives survey was modified for this most recent data collection, mostly to help clarify the meaning of some questions and provide more guidance to respondents. Respondents were given a link to complete the survey online. The development of the survey was guided by input from an international advisory committee convened for the purposes of collecting country level data and who are acknowledged for their invaluable contributions. The content covered consideration of what circumstances were CM in the country; specific policies regarding CM; legal responses to child sexual exploitation (CSE); services used to address CM; prevention strategies; and barriers to prevention. Data was gathered between December 2019 and February 2020. It is important to note that data on many of the issues may not have been available, requiring respondents to provide educated estimates.

ISPCAN

Downloadable Resource

(Member Access)

This Country Data Profile is based on information provided by knowledgeable professionals in the country. It is often difficult to capture the varying circumstances and ISPCAN was unable to verify the accuracy of the information. It is our hope that each profile offers a useful snapshot of issues related to child protection in each country. The 2020 World Perspectives survey was modified for this most recent data collection, mostly to help clarify the meaning of some questions and provide more guidance to respondents. Respondents were given a link to complete the survey online. The development of the survey was guided by input from an international advisory committee convened for the purposes of collecting country level data and who are acknowledged for their invaluable contributions. The content covered consideration of what circumstances were CM in the country; specific policies regarding CM; legal responses to child sexual exploitation (CSE); services used to address CM; prevention strategies; and barriers to prevention. Data was gathered between December 2019 and February 2020. It is important to note that data on many of the issues may not have been available, requiring respondents to provide educated estimates.

ISPCAN

Downloadable Resource

(Member Access)